Boys will be boys is never an excuse

What They're Saying...

 “This book provides a nuanced look at the toxicity of rape culture and the long-lasting and harming aftermath of sexual assault. VERDICT: Recommended for all YA shelves.” ~ Danielle Jacobs, School Library Journal

A beautifully crafted look at the complications of returning to ‘regular life’ after a devastating sexual assault. Fierce in its unapologetic dissection of rape culture, toxic masculinity, and athletic entitlement, Patty Blount does not hold her punches with respect to how difficult healing can be for an entire family. This book is thoughtful and thought-provoking, and ultimately very hopeful for survivors and those around them.” -Christa Desir, author of FAULT LINE and BLEED LIKE ME

“A blistering deconstruction of rape culture shown through the dissolving connection of two siblings post sexual assault. Timely, visceral and devastating, while ultimately hopeful.”  -Goodreads Reviewer

Educator’s Information

Guided Reading Level: Z+

Parental Advisory

Trigger Warning: SOMEONE I USED TO KNOW contains references to and descriptions of rape and sexual assault. 

I’m a parent so I know many of you are concerned about your children’s reading material. That’s why I’m now adding information on my website for each of my books. So you can make an informed decision on whether my novels are appropriate for your kid. I can’t tell you that. All I can do is tell you what’s in each book. 

SOMEONE I USED TO KNOW contains the following: 

Profanity — Characters use language including fuck, shit, hell, as well as various slang terms like tool, dick, douche. If you’re religious, you should know the Lord’s name is used in vain in multiple scenes. 

Sexual situations — There is no on-page sex in this story but the story contains descriptions of rape as recalled by the main character, Ashley, as well as by other characters in the story. There is a sexual scavenger hunt in which main characters participate, and during a meeting of the fictional “Guys Against Rape” group, various encounters involving rape and sexualized violence are described. 

Violence — Apart from the sexual violence previously described, there are no fight scenes except for arguments and a football tackle that goes too far. There is also a bit of self-harm in which main character Ashley whacks off her long hair after remembering her attacker pulling it during the assault. 

Themes — This story deals with family love, loyalty, rape culture, and toxic masculinity. The main characters’ family is intact but struggling to stay that way in the wake of Ashley’s assault and her brother’s role in that assault, specifically, his particpation in a sexual scavenger hunt. Rape culture and toxic masculinity, are the main themes presented throughout the story, with the primary message being a plea for good men to find the courage to step up and join the frequently unpopular conversation to end the sort of misogyny and sexism that allows crimes like rape, sexual assault, molestation, and harassment to be shrugged off with a simple “boys will be boys.”